fbpx
Dog Training Brisbane
Main Menu Options
Press Here for Doggy Tips, Tricks and Information to Help you

Dangerous Plants to Dogs

This list contains plants that have been reported as having systemic effects on animals and/or intense effects on the gastrointestinal tract. Please note that the information contained this list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but a sample on common plants encountered.

 If you suspect a plant has made your pet ill, don’t delay – take it straight to the vet, along with a sample of the plant, for identification. 
 
If you think your pet has ingested a toxic plant, it may be a medical emergency so please call your local veterinarian or a vet hospital.
 
 

Plants Dangerous to Pets

• Anemone or windflower (A. coronaria)
Brunfelsia (Yesterday-Today-Tomorrow plant causes seizures when dogs eat the toxic berries and seed pods.
• Bulbs (onions, plus all the spring-flowering favourites, such as daffodils, tulips, jonquils, and snowdrops)
 Caladium bicolor (indoor foliage plant)
• Castor oil plant (Ricinus communis)
• Chalice vine (Solandra maxima)
• Cherry tree (Prunus serrulata)
• Clematis (the large-flowered hybrids)
• Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster glaucophylla)
• Cycads (seeds on female plants)

Daffodils (Narcissus varieties)
• Daphne (various)
• Delphiniums
• Devil’s ivy (Epipremnum aureum)
• Dicentra (Dicentra spectabilis)
• Dieffenbachia
• Euphorbias (Poinsettias, Euphorbia characias ssp. wulfenii, etc)
• Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)
• Golden Robinia (R. pseudoacacia ‘Frisia’)
• Hellebore (Helleborus orientalis)
• Heliotrope (Heliotropium spp.) also called Hortensia: highly toxic, it can cause liver destruction when ingested
• Hemlock (Conium maculatum)
• Holly (Ilex varieties)
Hydrangeas
• Indoor Plants: many are poisonous to pets, so it’s wise to keep all indoor plants out of the reach of puppies and kittens especially, but also adult dogs and cats.
• Iris
• Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum)
• Jasmine (not clear which ones)

 
 

Lantana, also called Red sage, Wild sage, Yellow Sage, and Shrub Verbena. (L. camara, the common one)
• Lilac (Syringa varieties)
Liliums: All parts of the plant are particularly toxic to kittens and cats, causing kidney failure and death; reactions are not quite so severe in dogs.
• Mountain laurel (Kalmia varieties)
• Mushrooms (not clear which ones)
• Nightshade (Solanum nigrum)
• Oaks (Quercus varieties – the acorns are toxic to pets)
• Oleanders (Nerium oleander, Thevetia peruviana)
• Philodendron (many, it appears)
• Pine (e.g., savin, Juniperus sabina, also several others)
• Poinciana (not the tropical tree, but the shrub Caesalpinia pulcherrima)
• Potato plants and green potatoes
Privet (Ligustrum varieties)
• Pyracantha (unclear which one)
• Rhododendron (including azaleas)
• Rhubarb (presumably the leaves)
• Snowdrops (Leucojum)
• Snowflakes (Leucojum)
 Solandra maxima (chalice vine)
 Stephanotis (Madagascar jasmine) (consumption of the seed pods is especially deadly to dogs)
• Strelitzias (Strelitzia reginae, S. nicolai)
Sweet peas
• Toadstools
Tomato Plants

• Tulips
• Walnuts (mouldy nuts near the ground)
• Wandering Jew (Tradescantia albiflora) is very common in gardens especially in moist, shady areas. It is a horrible weed that will grow in near total shade and almost can’t be killed.
• Wisteria
• Yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana)
• Yew (Taxus varieties)